Category: Identification

A Floridian Stereum sp., a much thinner, poreless lookalike to the reishi.

Royoporus badius, black-footed polypore, can often look like reishi in the right light and conditions, but is very thin and flexible and has a very dark, comparitively narrow stipe.

Stereum sp., a common but easily differentiated lookalike to reishi.

reishidreams:

An unknown lookalike of reishi. I’d hedge my money on Ischnoderma resinosum, resinous polypore. The finely velveted cap and browner colors are immediately distinguishing factors, but more intimate analysis would be needed to confirm speciation.

Further information points towards a more fringe Laetiporus species, closely related to chicken of the woods. This is likely Laetiporus persicinus, white chicken mushroom.

An unknown lookalike of reishi. I’d hedge my money on Ischnoderma resinosum, resinous polypore. The finely velveted cap and browner colors are immediately distinguishing factors, but more intimate analysis would be needed to confirm speciation.

Ganoderma brownii, cousin to the reishi and member of the artist’s conk clade. This species is geographically restricted to the pacific northwest and found primarily in northern California. It has the tendency to add the year’s new growth in a vertical pile on top of previous growth and can lead to very large, densely stacked fruiting bodies.

A strange reishi lookalike, possibly of the genus Microporus, from Australia.

This mushroom has similar color and striations that are present on many other reishi-clade Ganoderma but is more fibrose, thinner, and lacks a shiny, laccate pileus. The pores are also almost impossible to distinguish individually on the pore surface, causing me to lean towards Microporus as a possible ID. Spore work and microscopy would be needed to accurately identify this specimen.

As someone who doesn't know much about fungi, how do you go about starting to learn to differentiate different species? I like to take pictures of them but I dont know what I'm taking pictures of yet and I dont know where to start

I go over the basics my mushroom identification video (which admittedly I haven’t watched since I made it, since I am usually too embarrassed to look at any of my videos as soon as I finish editing them).

There are a lot of identifying characteristics to pay attention to, but something a lot of beginners overlook is the underside of the cap!

Tomophagus colossus, also known as the Elephant’s Foot Polypore, is a rare tropical / subtropical member of Ganodermataceae. This particular specimen hails from Central America.

Fomitopsis pini-canadensis, the western red-belted conk, is very common in areas reishi is present and is often mistaken for our lacquered friend.